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Work Incentives

Definition - What does Work Incentives mean?

Work incentives refer to the special rules enacted by the U.S. Social Security Administration (SSA) which allows people with disabilities who receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Social Security Disability benefits to continue receiving their monthly payments and Medicaid or Medicare from SSA even when they start working. Although the rules for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and the Supplemental Security Income Program (SSI) are different, the purpose of the rules remains the same.

Justipedia explains Work Incentives

Work incentives were created by the SSA for disabled people to encourage them to try to gain meaningful employment without worrying about losing their disability benefits. The work incentives regulations are applicable to beneficiaries of Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and the Supplemental Security Income Program (SSI) who are trying to become self-sufficient. The types of incentives differ for SSI and SSDI. There are several programs that are part of work incentives such as Plan to Achieve Self-Support (PASS). Only when a disabled person starts earning above the limits set by the SSA are SSI payments terminated. The health insurance provided to disabled individuals who work is generally continued for a substantial period of time.
This definition was written in the context of Social Security

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