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Clinton v. City of New York (1998)

Definition - What does Clinton v. City of New York (1998) mean?

The legal case of Clinton v. City of New York related to the legality of the line-item veto under the Line Item Veto Act of 1996.

The court found that the Act was in violation of the U.S. Constitution, specifically that it violated the Presentment Clause within the Constitution. As such, the Act was removed from law.

The reason why it was illegal in its conception is because it allowed the U.S. President to have a unilateral right to veto, amend or repeal different parts of the statutes.

Justipedia explains Clinton v. City of New York (1998)

The Act was created in the first place to enable the president to nullify any part of any appropriation bill that they wanted to. This is obviously in violation of the U.S. Constitution, which does not allow the president to act as a dictator in having a unilateral right to decide on laws.

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