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Gun Control Act of 1968 (GCA, GCA68)

Definition - What does Gun Control Act of 1968 (GCA, GCA68) mean?

The Gun Control Act of 1968 was a piece of legislation passed during the Johnson Administration, which made a number of restrictions regarding gun laws in America.

This act came about as a response to the assassinations of key political and cultural figures in the 1960s, such as John F. Kennedy, Robert Kennedy and Martin Luther King Jr.

Justipedia explains Gun Control Act of 1968 (GCA, GCA68)

This act had a number of key provisions. The first was that it limited the interstate trade of guns, except among licensed gun retailers. It also prohibited certain citizens from being able to buy guns. These included felons, the mentally ill, drug addicts, minors and fugitives. Finally, it made it illegal to import military weapons into the country, except for those classified and used for sport. In short, this act created wide-scale changes related to gun ownership and gun commerce in the USA.

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