Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986

Definition - What does Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 mean?

The Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 was comprehensive federal legislation passed in an effort to address concerns regarding people who wrongfully entered and stayed in the United States.

Also known as the Simpson-Mazzoli Act, it addressed the status of illegal immigrants as classified under existing laws, changes to existing laws, and more.

Justipedia explains Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986

The Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 gave nearly three million people who had entered and remained in the United States without proper documentation or authorization a chance to become officially recognized or "legal" U.S. citizens.

Although it didn't end illegal immigration, the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 did take a significant step toward doing so by targeting employers that knowingly hired undocumented workers.

Although its effectiveness has been debated, this legislation remained relevant well into the 21st century, when U.S. lawmakers once again tackled immigration reform.

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