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Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC)

Definition - What does Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) mean?

The Securities and Exchange Commission is a federal agency that is tasked with regulating the securities industry. The Securities and Exchange Commission has 900 employees. Its headquarters are in Washington, D.C. The main purpose of this agency is to enforce federal securities laws in order to make sure that the markets are fair for investors.

The Securities and Exchange Commission is also known as the SEC.

Justipedia explains Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC)

The SEC has five commissioners. These commissioners must be approved by the senate, even though they are appointed by the president. The SEC aims to stop crimes such as fraud and insider trading. If companies are lying or are participating in other forms of manipulation, then this can lead to major losses by investors. The SEC tries to prevent these situations from occurring. The SEC also keeps its eye on and regulates corporate takeovers.

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