Writ of Mandate

Definition - What does Writ of Mandate mean?

A writ of mandate is an order from a court that is delivered to another court or to a government entity which instructs the recipient to cease any illegal activity or to correct any mistakes it might have made. Writs of mandate are used when one court believes another court, or a government agency, is doing something wrong, or has made some type of error during the process of performing its functions.

Justipedia explains Writ of Mandate

An example of a situation where a writ of mandate may be used is if one court believes that another court is doing something unlawful such as not adhering to certain legal procedures like not allowing a jury to deliberate, etc. in this circumstance, a writ of mandate may be given to the court believed to not be following the rules, by another court. Writs of mandates are basically like cease and desist letters or warnings given to parties who are believed to be doing something wrong.

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