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Objection

Definition - What does Objection mean?

An objection is a lawyer’s formal remonstration of an issue during a trial.

When a lawyer objects to something that the opposing counsel does or says, or something that the opposing counsel’s witness does or says, they are asking the court to determine whether the actions of the opposing counsel or the witness are legal and for a judge to determine if the court should officially disregard what was said or done that caused the objection.

Justipedia explains Objection

When a lawyer objects to something during a trial, the presiding judge will give a ruling on the objection.

If the judge agrees with the legal argument made by the lawyer who objected, the judge will rule that the objection is sustained. Essentially, then, the court is not to make an official note of, nor take what was said or done by the opposing counsel into consideration.

If the judge agrees with the legal argument made by the opposing lawyer who is not objecting, the judge will rule that the objection is overruled. The court can then make an official note of or take what was said or done by the opposing counsel into consideration.

Very rarely, a judge may attempt to not make a ruling on an objection in order to prevent an appeals court from being able to assess whether the judge ruled correctly.

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