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Tort

Definition - What does Tort mean?

A tort is an intentional or accidental civil wrong that causes injury or harm to someone else. It makes the individual committing the wrongful act legally liable to the person(s) suffering the injury or harm. Though negligence is the most common cause of a tort, sometimes crimes are also classified as torts.

Justipedia explains Tort

Any kind of civil wrong that can be rectified by requiring the individual or entity who committed the wrongful act to pay compensation to the victim is regarded as tort. Torts are generally classified under three categories: intentional torts, strict liability torts, and negligent torts. Assault, causing a car accident, medical malpractice, and product liability are some common examples of tort cases. The basic difference between a tort and criminal lawsuits is that criminal lawsuits have a higher burden of proof. Torts generally result from negligence instead of criminal actions.

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