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Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI)

Definition - What does Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) mean?

Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) is an income supplement program for disabled workers administered by the U.S. Social Security Administration (SSA). The program provides monthly payments to workers who suffer from temporary or permanent disability such that their medical condition prevents them from engaging in any substantial gainful activity (SGA).

Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) is also known as Workers' Disability.

Justipedia explains Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI)

SSDI is a need-based program for working individuals who become disabled before the age of 65 and are unable to perform any work due to the disability. The program is administered by the U.S. Social Security Administration (SSA) and is funded by payroll taxes. To qualify for SSDI, a claimant must have earned the required number of work credits. The number of work credits required depends on the age of the claimant. SSDI benefits are provided only to those disabled individuals who are unable to engage in any substantial gainful activity and whose condition is likely to last for at least 12 months.

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